Friday, 17 January 2014

Return To The Goddess

My yoga and meditation practice has continued daily, I just haven't had much time to write anything up recently.  I've mainly focused on hypnobirthing meditations, and continued to chant to Kali as I practised yoga.  

This morning, though, I sat at my altar to call sacred space, just intending to practise a few asanas.  Suddenly, I was inspired to return to my general goddess chant.  However, I changed which goddesses I called upon: Oya, Brigid, Cerridwen, Hekate, Kali, Isis, Tara, Hathor and Heqet.  The last two are the only new additions/replacements since I last chanted to the Goddess in this way: Heqet for help in childbirth, and Hathor because she is also a mother figure, with the milk from her breasts so abundant that it created the Milky-Way :)

This was probably inspired by a meditation I did a couple of days ago.  It was a guided hypnobirthing meditation from Well Rounded Mama, which talks about giving over your fears to what you consider divine, and having them returned to you transformed into gifts.  I've followed this meditation a few times now, but this go round I pictured Kali taking my fears and transforming them into a pentacle-etched shield, imbued with the energy of the Goddess.  It feels like there is so much going on right now, that having the support of different aspects of the Goddess just felt right...

8 comments:

  1. Who else but our Great Mother is able to guard and guide you trough these last weeks of pregnancy. Isn't wonderful we can call upon any aspect of Her at any given moment?. I have to admit I've strayed from Her for sometime and this post inspires me to meditate on how I can reestablish our relationship
    Thanks

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    1. Yes, the Great Mother offers us so many aspects, and we may need more than one of them at any time :) Glad this encourages you to reconnect to that source, Ellen!

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  2. I once read in the Bhagavad Gita to "make everything an offering." I've always considered offerings the "good" stuff - food on altars, compassion for others - but here it meant the "hard" stuff to, like my fears. That really clicked for me.

    This is off topic, but do you know of any online websites that explain witchcraft well? I am in a book club with a young girl who wears her wiccan identity like a tattoo on her forehead; I hate to judge, but I feel in her case it is a "look at me I'm a rebel" sort of thing (she's more about what she's against than what she's for). I have a friend also in the club who identifies as a progressive Christian, and because of the young girl's ideas and behavior thinks all pagans are like this. I'm trying to re-educate her, though here in the Deep South there aren't a lot of resources. Thanks!

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    1. Yes, I like that - to make everything an offering :)

      Not sure I can help much with the other. There are no pagan sites I regularly use. So many seem to get fundamental about one thing or another - are you a traditional witch or an alchemical witch or a high magick practitioner. Bah!

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    2. That was the problem I had when I searched. Isn't it weird that some pagans (of whatever category) are becoming as fundamental and rigid as the traditional religious groups? As I said to Ellen, it seems like we should be building bridges not burning them (regardless of what spiritual path we're on).

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    3. Sadly, it seems to be part of the human psyche, to a degree. Once you "get" something, you become fundamentalist about it to protect it until you feel a bit more secure in it. Perfect example - early psychoanalysis. Now, as the old guard die off, some can admit that Freud wasn't perfect and some of his ideas were tripe, but for a while there was lots of "all or nothing" thinking. I see it happening with the Lenormand craze, too, hope they loosen up soon ;)

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  3. # offerings: that is what i like about "giving over your fears to what you consider divine, and having them returned to you transformed into gifts". It sound almost like praying: You share you troubles with the Divine and find comfort and relief afterwards
    # resources: You say she identifies as Wicca. perhaps she doesn't want to know about witchcraft. Those two are not the same. Wicca is the religion and Witchcraft the practice. And perhaps the girl call herself wiccan because she likes spells????

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    1. That's an interesting perspective on the offerings, Ellen. In this case, because it was part of a guided meditation, I saw it more as a kind of inner spiritual work. Yet, really, what is the difference between that and prayer?

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